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Playing For Celtic

 
 
My Pal Jimmy Johnstone
MY pal Jimmy Johnstone by BOBBY LENNOX Playing For Celtic No.5 by Rodger Baillie I DON’T suppose there is any player in Scottish football who is more controversial than Jimmy Johnstone.

MY pal Jimmy Johnstone by BOBBY LENNOX Playing For Celtic No.5 by Rodger Baillie I DON’T suppose there is any player in Scottish football who is more controversial than Jimmy Johnstone. Some people idolise him, some are exasperated by him.I know him not just as Jimmy Johnstone who has been a teammate of mine for over ten years . . . but as the person who has been my best friend at Celtic Park for all that time.

What makes him tick, and what are the flaws that sometimes afflict the play of the little red-headed right winger? I think you have to start by saying that he’s like any great player-and to me wee Jimmy is a great player-and he's a bit temperamental That touch of temperament is something that goes with any great player, as much a part of their equipment as their boot laces.

Yet, more than any other player in Scotland, I believe he gets more pressure put on him from opposing players. And to me he has one skill above all his others . . . and it’s the one which has probably let him keep playing football.



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Posted by voc1967 on Thursday 26 November 2020 - 15:40:07 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
My Tragedy And Triumph By Dixie Deans
The football history books show that the Scottish Cup was won on Saturday.

The football history books show that the Scottish Cup was won on Saturday. May 6, 1972, when Celtic beat Hibs 6-1. But I know it was really won two days after a not-so-happy occasion for Celtic , the European Cup semi-final defeat by Inter-Milan at Parkhead.

It was then. on the Friday after that match, that our manager , Jock Stein. gathered his players together for a team talk. We must have been Britain’s most dejected bunch of footballers . . . and l was the guy at the top of the list.

I don't need to remind you that we had lost the game to Inter-Milan by 5-4 on penalties at the end of extra time , and I was the chief sinner. For I had missed the vital first penalty, and cost us the chance of that European Cup Final. I know there has been some criticism that I, as the least experienced player in the side as regards European football, was asked to take the kick.



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Posted by voc1967 on Thursday 03 September 2020 - 10:25:39 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Charlie Patrick Tully
Charles Patrick Tully.

Charles Patrick Tully . . . the name, still magic to many of Scotland‘s soccer fans is synonymous with the golden post-war days of football when the poorly-paid, highly-priced entertainers of that time made the turnstyles click to a boom only equalled by the unqualifled success of Celtic and 1n a smaller way Rangers today.

Charlie much to his discomfort, had to admit to being born on the 12th of july in Belfast. His great friends of his early period at Parkhead like Pat McAulay and Jock Weir seldom let him forget it-but the Irishman with his quick-witted ability to switch defence into attack as he did on the field, soon had them on the receiving end. I first met Charlie in 1946 in Belfast. I was enjoying a short holiday after a tonsil operation, and the Belfast boy was also recovering from a slight operation.

For the next few weeks I saw Belfast Celtic in action every Saturday. Charlie Tully and Jack Vernon were the stars of the side, and when I returned to Glasgow I told the Celtic management all about these two great Irish players .



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Posted by voc1967 on Monday 31 August 2020 - 12:01:44 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Sean Fallon's Story
THE accent-even after 20 years in Glasgow-still comes over with as strong an Irish brogue as any speaker in a St.

THE accent-even after 20 years in Glasgow-still comes over with as strong an Irish brogue as any speaker in a St. Patrick’s Day Parade.

But there is no doubt where the loyalties of Sean Fallon, the Celtic assistant manager have been for a very long time, firmly entrenched in Glasgow, S.E. Celtic’s connections with Ireland go back to the days of their founders-there has usually been at least one Irishman on their staff-but as Sean pointed out to me: ‘In the south, there has always been a greater interest in teams from England.

‘One of my earliest football heroes was the great Everton star, Dixie Dean, who played for my home town team, Sligo.’ Yet there was a thread running through his life, a connection which made him forget about his previous idols, Deans and Arsenal star Cliff Bastin, and turned him into a fervent Celtic fan. When his young sister was involved in a swimming accident, one of three men who helped rescue her turned out to be Joe McMenemy, son of the legendary Jimmy McMenemy, the inside-forward who had been one of Celtic’s greatest masters of soccer.



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Posted by voc1967 on Tuesday 25 August 2020 - 12:31:32 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
The Jimmy Johnstone Final
EVERY fan on the terraces, every observer in the press-box has his own private set of standards he uses to mark up the ability of a player in a game.

EVERY fan on the terraces, every observer in the press-box has his own private set of standards he uses to mark up the ability of a player in a game.

And because one person’s judgement can vary so widely from his neighbour's, it is the fuel which sets alight so many arguments on football, and gives the game its spice.

I suppose in a massive crowd of 103,000 you would get just as many opinions as people on how the game went, and on how the stars played.

But on the night of Wednesday, 12, May (1971) I don’t think you would have found many fans-Rangers supporters just as much as Celtic-to disagree with the choice of man of the match in the Scottish Cup Final replay.

For that honour went to the smallest man on the pitch, Celtic right winger Jimmy Johnstone, showing yet again that his giant soccer skills far outweigh his tiny frame.



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Posted by voc1967 on Monday 24 August 2020 - 18:59:30 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Harry , Harry ....Harry Hood - The Fans Chorus
I DON'T know what secret sign starts the chant-for it can begin even when I have not scored-but as sure as there are fans on the Parkhead terraces, I could bet my bonus that they will start up a chorus with that familiar refrain.

I DON'T know what secret sign starts the chant-for it can begin even when I have not scored-but as sure as there are fans on the Parkhead terraces, I could bet my bonus that they will start up a chorus with that familiar refrain . . . ‘Harry, Harry . . . Harry Hood!’ Its highly flattering to be singled out for special attention, but I have never been able really to work out why the fans have always awarded me this special accolade. The only reason I can think of is that when I first arrived at Celtic from Clyde one of the top favourites in the hit parade of the time was the song ‘Hare Krishna’ and my name happened to fit the music of that chorus.

I appreciate the support from the fans, but I don’t suppose they know the jokes it sparks off against me from my team-mates. It's all right if I’ve scored a goal . . . but it’s a different matter if things have not been going too well for me. Even the boss joins in! I think Mr. Stein sometimes imagines I pay for the choir to begin that chorus.

But if I am the object of praise from the Celtic fans, the chant is slightly twisted into another meaning by the Rangers fans . . . and I’ve had to sit and listen to it. I don’t very often go to matches involving the Ibrox team, but one game I did watch last season was their Scottish Cup semi-final replay against Hibs at Hampden. Over it came, loud and clear, just what they thought about Harry Hood.

I wonder what the reaction would have been if-they had known that the man about whom they were singing-or should I say jeering ?--Was sitting a few yards away from them in the Hampden stand.



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Posted by voc1967 on Monday 24 August 2020 - 11:59:14 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
The Night Liz Taylor And Richard Burton Became Celts
There has never been a European Cup tie quite like it!

There has never been a European Cup tie quite like it! It was not just the result, a 3-2 aggregate victory over the Hungarian side Ujpest Dozsa, nor was it just the efficient way Celtic achieved it.

It was also the game in which Celtic gained two new V.I.P. supporters, the film world’s nearest approach to royalty . . . Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. A few weeks before the game between Ujpest and Celtic in Budapest the world-famous Burtons had thrown a fabulous lavish party-with celebrities present from all over the worId-to celebrate Liz Taylor's fortieth birthday .

Yet it is doubtful if the stars who were at that party got as much pleasure from it as the second party the Burtons gave in Budapest . . . when the guests were 130 Celtic fans celebrating their team’s 2-1 first-leg victory in the European quarter quarter final.



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Posted by voc1967 on Sunday 23 August 2020 - 11:40:22 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
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