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Playing For Celtic

 
 
Bertie Auld - My Most Vital Match
IT WAS only a Glasgow Cup fixture, not perhaps the most glamorous of games in today’s star-studded fixture list.

IT WAS only a Glasgow Cup fixture, not perhaps the most glamorous of games in today’s star-studded fixture list . . . but, for me, it was the most important match of last season. Yes , even more than the League Cup final, the Scottish Cup final, or any of these wonderful European Cup matches.

Before you think I have suddenly rated the Glasgow Cup as the most important trophy of them all, maybe I had better explain. It was last October, and my first-team appearances had been few and far between for Celtic as the early months of the season ticked away.



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Posted by voc1967 on Tuesday 30 June 2020 - 13:38:45 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Evan Williams - My Dream Transfer
I NEVER spot people in a crowd at a League match.

I NEVER spot people in a crowd at a League match. As you can imagine, I have far too much on my mind to try to recognise familiar faces. But it is different at a reserve game.

Usually on the terracing there is only a handful of fans, and it is easier to pick out someone whom you may know. However, I must admit it is a rare occurrence even at a reserve fixture . . . but the day it happened to me it changed my entire football career... It was at a reserve match between Wolves and Liverpool at Molineux about eighteen months ago

Suddenly, during a break in the play, my Wolves team-mate, Francis Munro moved up beside me and muttered: ‘Take a look behind your goal when you can. I’m sure that’s Sean Fallon standing there.’



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Posted by voc1967 on Monday 08 June 2020 - 13:21:55 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
James Edward McGrory -- The Greatest Goalscorer
His name needs no preliminary flourishes.

His name needs no preliminary flourishes. no false fanfares, for he long ago carved his way into Scottish football history . . . and the place of Jimmy McGrory among the soccer giants is secure for ever.

The statistic that won James Edward McGrory his way into football's hall of fame sounds so simple to say-550 goals in his career from 1923 to 1937-but is still almost incredible to comprehend by a modern generation reared on defensive tactics aimed at blotting out attackers. I must declare my interest straight away, before I upset any older readers who may lovingly cherish memories of watching McGrory in his hey-day. I never saw him play, indeed I was not even born by the time he had retired from his long spell as Celtic’s number nine.



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Posted by voc1967 on Tuesday 10 March 2020 - 12:29:47 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
The Spin Of A Coin Benfica v Celtic 26-11-69
THE crowd, which had surged forward like men at a bar making sure of a last drink before closing-time, suddenly split as the green-blazered figure charged through them with the force of a Rugby forward rushing for the line.

THE crowd, which had surged forward like men at a bar making sure of a last drink before closing-time, suddenly split as the green-blazered figure charged through them with the force of a Rugby forward rushing for the line.

It was Celtic manager Jock Stein, pushing out of the referee’s room deep in the concrete bowl of Lisbon’s Stadium of Light on his way to tell his players that their captain, Billy McNeill ,, had won the toss against Benflca, the champions of Portugal . . . Celtic were through to the next round of the European Cup. That was the climax to the most incredible two hours and forty minutes i have ever seen on and off a football field . . . a match which started at 9.45 p.pm . on 26 November 1969 and the result was not determined until 12.25 a.m. the next morning.

Maybe that is part of the magic of the European Cup. No matter how many stamps are put in my passport as reminders of particular trips, there is always the likelihood that something different will happen, something when even the voice of the most experienced observer cannot claim he has seen it all before.

Believe me, something different happened that night! The stark soccer outline of the story was that Celtic had gone to play Benfica in the second round of the European Cup with a handsome three-goal lead. They had surrendered two of these goals by half time, then grimly clung to their one-goal lifeline lead to the next round until the fatal third minute of injury time when Benfica had scored again to equalise ...



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Posted by voc1967 on Sunday 16 February 2020 - 18:40:55 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Celtic Chief On Highlights Of Club History
Scotland stirred slowly out of its massive annual Hogmanay hangover on 1 January 1969, to find to its surprise that it had a new football knight.

Scotland stirred slowly out of its massive annual Hogmanay hangover on 1 January 1969, to find to its surprise that it had a new football knight. For overnight Celtic chairman Bob Kelly had become Sir Robert, and even in the often poisonous atmosphere which swirls around as the curse of Scottish football it is fair to say it was an award which brought general approval.

If we are to have an honours system with all its anomalies, there is no doubt that no football legislator deserves it more. Thousands of people who were not even football fans, never mind Celtic supporters, were happy that a slight to Scotland had at last been rectified. Despite the awards which had been given to the leading members of the England outfit who won the World Cup there was a genuine anger and it was amazing that the Government seemed unaware of it for so long that Celtic as the first British side to win the European Cup had not received one paltry medal in three honours lists after Lisbon.

It was perhaps unfortunate from the public opinion point of view that Sir Matt Busby’s knighthood came only a week after his Manchester United had followed Celtic as the second British side to capture the European Cup. Busby’s award, of course, was not just for winning the European Cup, but try telling that to the fan in the pub who could only see it as another example of a deliberate snub to a Scots club.



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Posted by voc1967 on Thursday 06 February 2020 - 18:35:01 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Celts In America
The modern soccer star’s passport might make even James Bond envious.

The modern soccer star’s passport might make even James Bond envious. For on the buff-coloured pages are stamped the visas and entry signs of nations right round the world.

These are the gateway to a look at the world which the average fan could only dream about from peeps at exotic brochures, and which would cost even wealthy tourists a fair slice of their fortunes.

A hop across the Atlantic on a giant jet is now a common summer jaunt for Britain’s top clubs, players can pick their way through the buzz and confusion of New York’s Kennedy Airport as easily as Glasgow’s Abbotsinch or London’s Heathrow.

Twice in three years Celtic have made the trip to America and Canada. Their stars have wandered down Broadway, gazed at Niagara Falls, crossed the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, and found out for themselves about Mexico City’s much publicised altitude problem.

I suppose that the supporter back home reading stories of teams travelling to such spots as Miami, New York, Toronto, Mexico City, can only murmur with envy: ‘What a life . . . and just to play football.’

Well, it is a wonderful life. But behind the glamour and excitement of these tours and even the most experienced traveller can still get a thrill seeing again that wonderful New York sky-line - there is a double purpose.



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Posted by voc1967 on Tuesday 28 January 2020 - 09:53:40 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
 
 
Jock Stein ... The Man And His Methods
The best unsolicited tribute to Jock Stein came from the chairman of an opposition First Division side, whose team had just been swept aside by the soccer whirlwind called Celtic.

The best unsolicited tribute to Jock Stein came from the chairman of an opposition First Division side, whose team had just been swept aside by the soccer whirlwind called Celtic.

The club chairman took him aside in the boardroom and as Stein sipped his customary Coke joked: ‘We were all jogging along making a living until you arrived.’

But it was a joke with the ring of truth, for it was a revolution which Stein and his methods brought to Scottish football, and one which fortunately many clubs have tried to follow.

That revolution gave the most important people in football - the fans a real glimpse of another soccer world which most of them had seen on their television screens and seemed to be the copyright of European teams such as Real Madrid and Benfica.



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Posted by voc1967 on Tuesday 21 January 2020 - 13:08:18 | Comments: 0  |  printer friendly
 
 
 
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